Instructors’ Stages of Concern and Levels of Use of Active Learning Strategies: The Case of HDP Programs of Three Higher Learning Institutes in Amhara Region

  • Alemayehu Bishaw
  • Solomon Melesse

Abstract

This study aimed at examining the instructors‟ stages of concern and levels of use of active learning strategies. Seventy-nine instructors who participated in Higher Diploma Program in three higher learning institutes found in the Amhara region were taken as data sources. Questionnaire adapted from SoCQ was employed. In addition, panel and informal discussions with Pedagogical Sciences Department instructors were used as instrument for data collection. Pearson Product Moment Correlation, chi-square tests, t-test and ANOVA were the statistical techniques employed in this study. The results indicated that there is high but negative correlation between SoC and LoU of active learning strategies. In addition, the analysis of t-test and ANOVA has revealed that there is no mean difference as a function of difference in qualification, experience, number of short term trainings and taking education courses. The Chi-square result indicated that instructors are at the non adopter stages of concern. The result also indicated that instructors are not practicing active learning strategies in the actual classroom setting. The panel discussion ascertains that instructors are not interested in some aspects of the program such as provision for information about the concept of active learning, its importance, etc. in the actual teaching learning process. They consider this part of the program boring and time consuming. Finally, conclusions and implications for instructors‟ professional development are suggested.

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References

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Published
2007-06-02
How to Cite
BISHAW, Alemayehu; MELESSE, Solomon. Instructors’ Stages of Concern and Levels of Use of Active Learning Strategies: The Case of HDP Programs of Three Higher Learning Institutes in Amhara Region. The Ethiopian Journal of Higher Education, [S.l.], v. 4, n. 2, p. 103 - 135, june 2007. Available at: <http://ejol.aau.edu.et/index.php/EJHE/article/view/283>. Date accessed: 16 dec. 2017.